Dating spode porcelain

Around 1880, the English made those ceramics lighter in weight, more translucent, and stronger by adding ground bone ash from farm animals to the wet clay, according to by Frank Farmer Loomis IV.By 1842, Spode was one of the factories operating in England making what is known as “bone china” along with Coalport, Wedgwood, Worchester, and a number of other companies.Many are beautiful works of art in their own right; taken together, their importance rests in part in their completeness, but also as a historic document of changing design styles over two centuries.Georgian simplicity, Regency opulence, Victorian naturalism, sentimentality, Pre-Raphaelite styles, Japanese revival, Arts and Crafts, Art Deco, 1950s modernism and late 20th century designs are all there, including the originals of iconic patterns still in production, such as Christmas Tree, Woodland and Stafford Flowers.The factory was modernized in 1923, which included the addition of electric power.In 1976, Spode merged with Worcester Royal Porcelain to become Royal Worcester Spode, Ltd.You may find that you can do this yourself from these links. You can also find examples of backstamps illustrated on my my Spode ABC where you find all sorts of Spode history information.Using the Spode archive and published books you can learn about different backstamps (marks) on Spode pieces.

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Start of the Spode business to 1833: the company was known as Spode.

Josiah Spode I died suddenly in 1797 and it fell to his son Josiah Spode II to continue and perfect his father’s developments.

In partnership with William Copeland, Josiah II continued the business for the next thirty years Under their management in the early 19th century, considered by many to be the “Golden Age” of English ceramics, the company grew to be the largest pottery in Stoke and a pre-eminent manufacturer of fine ceramics of every kind.

Here it is carefully looked after and is accessible to the public.

Please visit my page The Spode Archive for On this page, below, you will find links to my relevant blogposts about finding out about your Spode and Copeland pieces.

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